Summer already?

Summer vacation is here – a time to rest, recharge, and most importantly, reflect. Personally, I find myself thinking about the goals my students and I set at the beginning of the year. Although I’m sad to see the school year end, there’s still lots to celebrate. Not only did my students and I have fun learning together all year, but we also accomplished almost all our goals!

On the first day of instruction for the 2013-2014 school year, each student made one long term goal on a Khan Academy leaf (available here in Coach and Classroom Resources!). When we were disassembling our leaves from the ‘We <3 2 Learn’ bulletin board on the last day of school, we noted that 91% of the kids met their yearly goal! This was cause for celebration. In addition, I created and met the goal of beginning Khan Academy on the first day. After that was achieved, I added the goal of continuing with KA until the last day of school. This was easy because this class LoVeD Khan Academy. It is evident in the data. As a class, they mastered 4,432 modules. Energy points were very motivating for my 4th graders. Collectively, they earned over 14,295,000! Usually, their homework consisted of spending 20 minutes on the site mastering skills on the playlist. Consistently, they invested many more minutes than were required. All together, ‘my’ kids spent more than 160,272 minutes (or 4,338 hours). My highest girl progressed all the way to writing expressions and my highest boy mastered measurement precision. I love Khan Academy for this reason. High performing students can progress as fast as they can.

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This was my third year using Khan Academy as the platform of my blended learning rotational model. I can confidently say, that KA has been the best tool, motivator and model for my students and myself. My ‘We <3 2 Learn’ continues to be an 80 minutes math ‘program’ that allows me time to coach individual students on skills he/she is struggling to understand. Peer coaching took off this year. It was a treat to see how my 9 year olds could create and communicate new ways of solving math problems.

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For me, this was the most motivating year so far. There was literally a buzz in our classroom during math time. Students were engaged and excited to learn. The highlight of the year for me was my visit to Brazil. After two observations by the Brazil folks, I was asked to speak at their innovations in education conference: Transformar. Remember, I am a fourth grade teacher, not a public speaker. After I quickly got used to the 800+ faces looking at me, I just spoke about my passion for Khan Academy and for my blended learning rotational model.

I set five personal development goals for the year.

1. I challenged myself to increase the rigor of my performance tasks. Check.

2. I had the obligation to change my Board Math template to Common Core Board Math. I used KA’s Common Core map to find the most rigorous practice problems to include in my weekly board. Check.

3. It was important to me that Khan Academy was utilized every day of class. Check.

4. I wanted to use KA in a different way. I had never used playlists, so I added this method. I really liked it! Check.

5. It was important that I share my ideas with anyone interested in observing. Check. We had more visits than I can remember!

Khan Academy is constantly evolving. Khan Academy models exactly what I want for my students. Together we have achieved so much. Burnett students took risks, learned how to coach classmates, opened their creative minds, learned many new skills and became experts at collaborating. These students organically set long and short term goals for themselves. I genuinely believe that the students in Room 303 love to learn. This is a gift that Khan Academy and I gave to each one of my amazing students.

As the summer progresses, I know that many more creative scenarios will be designed for the 2014-2015 school year; We <3 2 Learn will be better than ever!

My top 3 classroom hacks

Hello Khan Academy Teachers!

I’m Suney Park, Khan Academy’s Teacher-in-Residence and 6th grade teacher at Eastside College Prep.

As summer ends every year, I always think about one change or ‘hack’ I can make to my classroom. This summer I compiled a list of the great hacks I heard from Khan Academy educators - can you add your favorites to this too?

My top three hacks:

1. Classroom Scavenger Hunt. Host a hunt at the beginning of the year to help students become familiar with the classroom and where all the supplies are. You could also try a virtual scavenger hunt on Khan Academy’s site to help students discover all of its cool features. I did this last year and my kids discovered new things on the site that I didn’t even know existed! To see my Scavenger Hunt, visit this page and scroll to the bottom on “Introducing KA to your students”.

2. Need help/can help board. A place where students can write their name and the concept they would like help with. Other students can write their name next to someone they are capable of helping. Perfect for Khan Academy, but useful for any activity, the board builds a strong community environment in the classroom. See a picture of this board on Facebook.

3. 30min peer tutoring role play. Ask students to role-play a good example and a bad example of peer tutoring. Then as a class, write down all the qualities of a good peer tutor, e.g. they ask me questions instead of telling me the answer, they are patient, etc. This worked great when using a Need Help/Can Help Board.

What’s the one thing you’re changing in your classroom this coming year? Share it on our Facebook wall and see what other Khan Academy teachers are sharing!

Khan Academy Summer Math Review

Looking for a list of skills to review this summer? Check out the recommended practice exercises courtesy of the Boys’ Latin School in Maryland.  

For more math practice, log in and explore Khan Academy’s knowledge map.

Grade 6 Math 
1.      Adding and subtracting negative numbers
2.      Multiplying and dividing negative numbers
3.      Adding decimals
4.      Multiplying decimals
5.      Subtracting decimals
6.      Dividing decimals
7.      Greatest common divisor
8.      Least common multiple
9.      Divisibility
10.  Order of operations
11.  Mean median and mode
12.  Adding and subtracting fractions
13.  Multiplying fractions
14.  Dividing fractions
15.  Triangle types
16.  Angle types
17.  Converting decimals to percents
18.  Converting percents to decimals
19.  Converting mixed numbers and improper fractions
20.  Simplifying fractions

Pre-Algebra
1. Adding and subtracting negative numbers
2. Subtracting Decimals
3. Adding Decimals
4. Absolute Value
5. Division 3
6. Multiplying Decimals
7. Greatest Common Divisor (Factor)
8. Division 4
9. Order of Operations
10. Least Common Multiple
11. Exponents I
12. Adding and Subtracting Fractions
13. Multiplying Fractions
14. Dividing Fractions
15. Linear Equations
16. Complimentary and Supplementary Angles
17. Graphing Points 2
18. Ordering Numbers
19. Equivalent Fractions 2
20. Writing Expressions

Algebra 1
1. Prime Factorization
2. Greatest Common Factor 
3. Least Common Multiple
 
4. Dividing Fractions 
5. Order of Operation 
6. Evaluating Expressions 
7. Scientific Notation - video 
7. Scientific Notation - exercise
8. Exponent Rules 
9. Pythagorean Theorem 
10.  Percentage Word Problems 
11.  Writing Expressions
12.  Graphing Points 
13.  Slope of a Line 
14.  Graphing Linear Equations 
15.  Graphing Inequalities 
16.  Graphing Systems of Equations 
17.  Simplifying Radicals 
18.  Multiplying Expressions 
19.  Factoring  Polynomials 
20.  Factoring Difference of Squares

Geometry and
Geometry Honors
1. Angles 1
2. Angles 2
3. Complementary and Supplementary Angles
4. Distance Formula 
5. Solid Geometry
6. Adding Fractions
7. Dividing Fractions
8. Identifying Slope of a Line
9. Factoring Polynomials 1
10. Multi-step Equations
11. Multiplying Polynomials
12. Equations of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
13. Multi-Step Linear Inequalities
14. Evaluating Expressions in 2 variables
15. Systems of Equations
16. Multiplying Expressions 1
17. Simplifying Radicals
18. Pythagorean Theorem
19. Special Right Triangles
20. Trigonometry 0.5

Algebra II
1. Inverses of Functions
2. Domain of a Function
3. Quadratic Formula
4. Solutions to Quadratic Equations
5. Systems of Equations
6. Solving Quadratics by Taking the Square Root
7. Solving Quadratics by Factoring
8. Graphing Parabolas in Standard Form
9. Graphing Paraboloas in All Forms
10. Equation of a Line
11. Solving for the Y-Intercept
12.  Completing the Square 1
13.  Trigonometry 1
14.  Simplifying Expressions with Exponents
15.  Factoring difference of squares 2
16.  Linear Equations 4
17.  Writing Expressions 2
18.  Inverse Trig Functions
19.  Shifting and Reflecting Functions
20. Vertex of a Parabola

Algebra II Honors
1. Solving for the Y-Intercept (Alg I)
2. Average Word Problems (Alg I)
3. Multi-step linear inequalities (2.1-3)
4. Linear Equations 4 (3.1-4)
5. Systems of Equations (3.5)
6. Domain of a Function (3.8)
7. Simplifying Expressions with Exponents (4.2)
8. Multiplying Expressions 1 (4.3)
9. Solving Quadratics by Factoring (4.5)
10. Factoring difference of squares 2 (4.6)
11.Simplifying Rational Expressions I  (5.4) 

12. Simplifying Rational Expressions II (5.4)
13. Multiplying Complex Numbers (6.7)
14. Completing the Square 1 (7.1)
15. Quadratic Formula (7.2)
16. Shifting and Reflecting Functions (7.5)
17. Inverses of Functions (10.3)
18. Trigonometry 1 (12.2)
19. Trigonometry 1.5 (12.2)
20. Writing Expressions 2 (whole text)

Precalculus
1. Systems of Equations and Inequalities
2. Trigonometry 2
3. Unit Circle
4. Trig Identities
5. Logarithms 2
6. Even and odd functions
7. Complex numbers
8. Exponents 4
9. Graphing Systems of Equations
10. Adding and Subtracting Fractions
11. Absolute Value of Complex Numbers
12. Scaling Vectors
13. Vectors
14. Domain and Range
15. Dividing Fractions
16. Degrees to Radians
17. Completing the Square
18. Factoring Polynomials
19. Inverse Trig Functions
20. Radical Equations

Pre-calculus Honors
1. Systems of Equations and Inequalities
2. Trigonometry 2
3. Unit Circle
4. Trig Identities
5. Logarithms 2
6. Even and odd functions
7. Complex numbers
8. Exponents 4
9. Graphing Systems of Equations
10. Adding and Subtracting Fractions
11. Dividing Polynomials by Binomials 3
12. Scaling Vectors
13. Vectors
14. Domain and Range
15. Dividing Fractions
16. Pythagorean Identities
17. Completing the Square
18. Factoring Polynomials
19. Inverse Trig Functions
20. Radical Equations 

Applied Calculus Honors
1. Expressions with Unknown Variables 2 
2. Logarithms 2 
3. Radical Equations
 
4. Domain of a Function 
5. Solving Quadratics by Factoring
6. Quadratic Formula
7. Trigonometry 1 (Alg 2) 
8. Trigonometry 1.5 (Alg 2)
9. Inverse Trig Functions (PC)
 
10. Limits 1
11. Limits 2 
12. Derivative Intuition
 
13. Derivatives I 
14. Power Rule
15. Chain Rule
 
16. Product Rule 
17. Quotient Rule 
18. Special Derivatives 
19. Unit Circle 
20. Trig Identities

 AP Calculus AB 
1. Limits 1 
2. Limits 2 
3. Derivative Intuition 
4. Derivatives I 
5. Power Rule 
6. Chain Rule 
7. Product Rule 
8. Quotient Rule  
9. Special Derivatives 
10. L’Hopital’S Rule 
11.Unit Circle 
12.Trig Identities
13. Inverse Trig Functions 
14.Adding Vectors 
15.Scaling Vectors 
16.Simplifying Rational Expressions 3 
17.Logarithms 1 
18. Logarithms 2 
19. Recognizing Concavity
20. Recognizing Slope

Summer slide? Nope, swing into summer learning!

U.S. teachers across the country are eager to ensure their students stay fresh through summer into autumn on all the concepts they worked so hard to learn this past school year.  

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Check out how a handful of these educators are combatting the summer slide and instead are swinging into summer learning:

In Maryland, The Boys’ Latin School is encouraging a Summer Math Review, and had their students sign up to Khan Academy and work on a focused set of recommended skills for the relevant grade level. Check out their Khan Academy Summer Math Review list which recommends math exercise content for 6th grade up through AP Calculus AB.  

In Arizona, 6th grade teacher Courtney Biller personalized her students’ summer learning with a note to parents introducing Khan Academy, and an individualized suggested list of exercises for their child to work on. She is also sharing the joy in her other day job, teaching future teachers about Khan Academy as a free resource for their classrooms. She exclaimed, “I love how student friendly your site is!”

In West Virginia, Derek Oldfield is not waiting for the Fall to get his students started on Khan Academy. His students are all already signed up on Khan Academy. He is stoked that students wanting to start the school year ahead of the pack are already getting started.

In Texas, the folks at UT Brownsville recently had a Khan Academy training for their faculty to learn how start using Khan Academy in their classes, and are clearly wasting no time to scale the impact. This summer they are incorporating Khan Academy into their freshmen Summer Bridge and Math Department Boot Camps to prepare students for university level math.

Eager to get started? Check out more at www.khanacademy.org/coach-res!

A little while ago, we had a guest post from education non-profit Numeric in South Africa that is using Khan Academy with their students. Founder Andrew Einhorn recently sent this little update that we thought was really fun, and exciting to hear about the progress happening in South Africa. 


Firstly, we continue to enjoy Khan Academy as much as we did when we started in 2011.  It just gets better and better, and we&#8217;re loving the new tutorial format/look-and-feel.Our kids are happy too.  I recently visited one of the programmes in a very poor area called Mitchells Plain.  The kids had prepared a little dance for us, to which the lyrics were &#8220;Khan Academy is so cool cause I love maths!&#8221; (see photo).  With a bit of luck we&#8217;ll have some footage of this dance to send through to you guys at some point.As far as Numeric goes, we recently hit the 500 learner mark.  Because Khan Academy does so much of the admin work for us - lectures done, exercises graded electronically, classlists and results tabulated automatically - we are able to run these programmes in a very lean fashion.  We have 17 active coaches and are able to deliver over 1500 learner hours of Khan Academy each week!In South Africa there is still a mountain to climb.  The average score on our national Grade 9 maths assessment was 13.9% last year.  But I am increasingly optimistic about the prospect of a turnaround and I have little doubt Khan Academy will have a large role to play in doing that.I hope this finds you well.  Best wishes to you and the team.  Andrew 

A little while ago, we had a guest post from education non-profit Numeric in South Africa that is using Khan Academy with their students. Founder Andrew Einhorn recently sent this little update that we thought was really fun, and exciting to hear about the progress happening in South Africa. 

Firstly, we continue to enjoy Khan Academy as much as we did when we started in 2011.  It just gets better and better, and we’re loving the new tutorial format/look-and-feel.

Our kids are happy too.  I recently visited one of the programmes in a very poor area called Mitchells Plain.  The kids had prepared a little dance for us, to which the lyrics were “Khan Academy is so cool cause I love maths!” (see photo).  With a bit of luck we’ll have some footage of this dance to send through to you guys at some point.

As far as Numeric goes, we recently hit the 500 learner mark.  Because Khan Academy does so much of the admin work for us - lectures done, exercises graded electronically, classlists and results tabulated automatically - we are able to run these programmes in a very lean fashion.  We have 17 active coaches and are able to deliver over 1500 learner hours of Khan Academy each week!

In South Africa there is still a mountain to climb.  The average score on our national Grade 9 maths assessment was 13.9% last year.  But I am increasingly optimistic about the prospect of a turnaround and I have little doubt Khan Academy will have a large role to play in doing that.

I hope this finds you well.  

Best wishes to you and the team.  

Andrew 

Diepsloot Community centre: Hoping for change through Khan Academy

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As reported in The Daily Maverick

Fourteen-year-old Rhoda Chitegha, a grade 9 pupil from Diepsloot north of Johannesburg, was struggling to pass maths until she discovered a small Khan Academy maths class at her local community centre.

“I didn’t understand most of the concepts in maths and that is why it was hard for me. There are about 44 children in my maths class in Diepsloot and you don’t always get a lot of time with the teacher, but since I have come here (to the Khan Maths project at the Diepsloot community centre), maths has become fun and I have learnt so many more things than I knew before. It is easy to enjoy maths here. There are videos to watch and people who will help you,” says Chitegha, during a break from her course.

The Khan Maths project operates from a connected computer room in a community centre on the outskirts of what is one of Johannesburg’s most densely populated urban settlements…”

See the full article here

 

Beyond the videos in Kathy Day Bobb’s math class

Watching Khan Academy videos is anything but a passive activity for Kathy Day Bobb’s 5th grade students. What’s intriguing about how this elementary school teacher is integrating Khan Academy into her curriculum is that she doesn’t just ask students to watch a video at home. She has them reflect on what they learned by using a Google survey as homework where her 5th graders write about what the they learned in the video, any questions that arose while they watched at home, and how they would approach teaching the concept to their peers. 

Kathy takes this resource even further in her classroom, reviewing survey results with students to spark discussion and inform her lesson. Kathy provides additional clarity around the topic based on the students’ questions. She also asks students to identify what makes a good explanation - and to provide feedback on both her style, and Sal’s. This discussion encourages critical thinking about a lesson. Based on the lesson, Kathy empowers her students to then create their own Khan Academy style videos on their iPads. What better way to show that you understand a topic than to explain it to your peers?  

Check out this video from two 5th graders in Kathy’s class who explain a sample problem in their video “Beyond the Lesson: Algebraic Equations”image

http://www.screenchomp.com/t/dB7cTgoBMGDV

Are you using KA videos in your school? Let’s us know how you’re integrating it into your interactive classroom!